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CAPS 1622 : The World of Modern Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2222, HIST 1622 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1868, samurai revolutionaries and their allies seized the reins of power and established a new capital they called Tokyo.  Against all odds, this fragile regime survived and made Tokyo a center of power that would transform both Japan and the world.  This survey of Japanese history explores the rise and fall of Japan as a modern imperial power; its foreign relations; its economic and scientific development from "feudalism" to futuristic technologies; and Japan's many modern revolutions, from the rule of the samurai to Westernization and democracy, from democratic collapse to fascism and World War II, and from Japan's postwar rebirth to the present.  We will examine not only big events but also everyday life, including gender and sexuality, family and schools, and art and popular culture.
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CAPS 2212 : Introduction to China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2212 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese culture especially designed for students not majoring in Asian Studies. Explores literature, history, religion, and art, and other aspects of China's rich and diverse heritage, from earliest times to the present.
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CAPS 2262 : Medicine and Healing in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2262, BSOC 2561, HIST 2562, STS 2561 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An exploration of processes of change in medicine in China.  Focuses on key transitions, such as the emergence of canonical medicine, of Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, of Buddhist medicine and medical relief, of "Scholar Physicians," and of "traditional Chinese medicine" in modern China.  Examines the development of new healing practices in relation to both popular and specialist views of the body and disease, "cultivating vitality" practices, modes of transmission of medical knowledge, and healer-patient relations. 
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CAPS 2985 : Transformations in Twentieth Century China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2286, HIST 2985 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The twentieth century was a time of unprecedented change in China as the country's ancient imperial system collapsed and a new modern order began to emerge. This course will explore the myriad transformations that occurred during this remarkable century of revolution and renewal. Among the major changes that we will focus on are the fall of the Qing dynasty, the intellectual awakening of May Fourth, the rise of the Nationalist party-state, and key events of the Communist era, such as the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution under Mao Zedong and the capitalist reforms of Deng Xiaoping. The class will encourage historical reflection on China's engagement with the modern world in order to better understand the complex reality of China today.
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CAPS 3140 : U.S. in the World
Crosslisted as: AMST 3140, HIST 3140 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students examine the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century. The course focuses on the domestic sources of foreign policy and the assumptions of the major policy makers (Wilson through Bush), as well as U.S. relations with pivotal global actors. Important themes include the American response to a revolutionary world since 1912, American response to colonialism and anticolonialism, and role of different areas of government, from the president to the CIA, in the making of U.S. foreign policy.
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CAPS 3307 : Readings in Classical Chinese Literature
Crosslisted as: CHLIT 3307, CHLIT 6607 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A guided reading in the original language designed to introduce students to a variety of genres and styles of classical Chinese literature while at the same time helping students achieve competence in reading classical Chinese at an advanced level. The syllabus, with a rotating thematic focus, normally includes philosophical works, historical texts, poetry and prose, anecdotes and fiction. Please consult the Department of Asian Studies course offerings for each year's thematic focus.
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CAPS 3370 : Nature Imagined and Experienced: Ancient Chinese Travel Literature
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3370, ASIAN 6670 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course traces the development of travel writing from the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 221) to the Song dynasty (960–1279). Special attention is paid to the ways in which Chinese writers have ceaselessly negotiated humankind's relationship with the natural world in their accounts of travel—both imagined and actual. Readings selected for investigation are assigned in English translation.
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CAPS 3380 : China's Economy Under Mao and Deng
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3393, ECON 3380 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Examines the development of the Chinese economy and the evolution of China's economic system between the early 1950s and late 1990s.
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CAPS 3387 : The Asian Century: The Rise of China and India
Crosslisted as: AEM 3388, ASIAN 3380, ASIAN 6680, GOVT 3384, GOVT 6384, ILRIC 3380, ILRIC 5380 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The course will be thoroughly comparative in order to highlight both the specificity of each country as well as more generalizable dynamics of 21st century development. It will be divided into a number of inter-related modules. After a framing lecture, we will briefly cover the two countries' distinct experiences with colonialism and centralized planning. Then we will move on to dynamics of growth, which will seek to explain the relative success of China in the era of market reforms. In analyzing political consequences, we will assess how new forms of cooperation and conflict have emerged. This will involve attention to both internal dynamics as well as how rapid development has seen an increasing accumulation of political power in the East. It goes without saying that accelerating growth has led to huge social change, resulting in profound reorganizations of Chinese and Indian society. Finally, the course will conclude by returning to our original question – is this indeed The Asian Century? What does the rise of China and India mean for the rest of the world, and how are these two giant nations likely to develop in the future?
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CAPS 3502 : Becoming a China Hand
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3503 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines the various issues that surround being a specialist of one of the world's most complex and exciting places. The course will first look at the various groups of people that have been China Hands, including missionaries, academics, businesspeople, journalists, and government officials. One central theme is the continual conflict between being a country specialist and gaining an understanding of the broader world. The second part of the class considers the strategies for going into the field and doing research on China, including finding a host and making connections, using written sources (electronic and printed), conducting interviews, and implementing formal surveys. The last segment of the class considers the charge that China Hands are prone to self-censorship because of ideological affinity.
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CAPS 3827 : China and the World
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3327, GOVT 3827 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Study of the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People's Republic of China (PRC), and concentrating more specifically on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy involves not only a consideration of the evolution of China's relations with its major bilateral partners but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students are asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior.
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CAPS 4001 : China in Transition
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Using resources specifically available in China, this course combines lectures, guest lectures, field trips, and faculty-directed research projects to help students achieve an in-depth understanding of China's changing politics, economy, society, and culture.
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CAPS 4002 : Chinese Perspectives on International and Global Affairs
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course, offered by faculty members of Peking University's School of International Studies, provides Chinese perspectives on contemporary China's international relations.
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CAPS 4010 : Honors Thesis Tutorial I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Honors students conduct research to prepare a thesis on a topic of their own choosing under the direction of a faculty member. The application must be successfully submitted and an Honors Committee formed by the end of applicant's junior year in order for the student to be an honors candidate. Permission to enroll in CAPS 4020 is contingent upon the advisor's judgement of the viability of the student's honors thesis by the end of the semester.
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CAPS 4020 : Honors Thesis Tutorial II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Honors students complete research and finish a thesis on a topic of their own choosing under the direction of a faculty member.
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CAPS 4030 : Issues in China and Asia-Pacific Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course serves as the wrap-up seminar for CAPS students.  It is designed for CAPS seniors to review the critical issues and topics in China and Asia-Pacific Studies from broader theoretical perspectives, to engage in academic discourse and policy debate about implications of China rising, to reflect on their four-year learning experience in Ithaca, Washington, D.C., and Beijing as students of contemporary China studies, and to enhance their abilities to pursue future studies and/or careers that are related to their CAPS experience after graduating from Cornell.  The seminar is organized around the central theme - China rising - and roughly divided into three sections:  (1) China's rise and the "paradigm change" in world politics; (2) China's quest for identity and order; and (3) implications of China rising for the U.S. and the world.  Under each of these sections, a few specific topics are identified for class discussion.
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CAPS 4071 : Law Culture and Society in China
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What are the main obstacles on China's road towards the Rule of Law? What is the role of law in combatting corruption, protecting human rights and facilitating economic development in China? How are traditional views of Confucianism and Legalism influencing modern Chinese institutions and individuals? This course examines these and other complex issues by employing interdisciplinary and comparative approaches, focusing on the interaction between legal, cultural and social phenomena: how law shapes culture and society and how forms of culture and social relations influence the modernization of law.  The course is designed for undergraduate students who are interested in understanding contemporary China and Chinese law, especially the role of law in political, social and economic development.
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CAPS 4127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, FGSS 4127, HIST 4127, HIST 6127 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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CAPS 4406 : Readings in Chinese History and Business Culture
Crosslisted as: CHIN 4406, CHIN 6606 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed for those who have studied Mandarin to the advanced level (or equivalent). The course is aimed to continuously improve students' Chinese proficiency while, at the same time, preparing them for studying or working in a Chinese native environment. Along with the growth of Chinese economy, issues on Chinese business and economy become a hot topic. Following this trend, authentic Chinese materials selected from a variety of sources will be introduced in class to enhance students' Chinese professional skills and promote their understanding of the macro and micro business environment as well as the business related historical and cultural issues in China.
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CAPS 4420 : Tang Poetry: Themes and Contexts
Crosslisted as: CHLIT 4420, CHLIT 6620, MEDVL 4420 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Through guided readings in Chinese of selected poems of the Tang dynasty (618-907) on various themes and in different styles, students develop the essential analytical skills for reading Tang poetry while gaining an understanding of its social, cultural, and historical contexts.
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CAPS 4870 : China and Asian Security
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4475, GOVT 4877, GOVT 6877 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses primarily on China's evolving role in both Asia and world politics. While China may not necessarily be the sole determinant of the type of security order that will prevail in Asia, it has a profound influence on the region and potentially on the global order as well. To gain an understanding of security issues in Asia today, the seminar attempts to come to terms with the evolving nature of China's foreign policy and national security strategies. The course then concentrates on the most influential academic work on China's foreign relations and national security policies that has been published since the end of the Cold War.  
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CAPS 4998 : Politics and Policy: Theory, Research, and Practice
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This required course forms the core of the Cornell in Washington program for students in the public policy option. The central course objective is to provide students with the instruction and guidance necessary to analyze and evaluate their own chosen issue in public policy. Toward that end, the course has three components: (1) weekly lectures providing background on the structures and processes of national politics and policy as well as training in research methodology; (2) student externships; and (3) individual research papers or projects. All three components interrelate so as to provide students with a strategy and framework for integrating classroom based learning, field experience and individual research.
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CAPS 4999 : CAPS Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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CAPS 4999 : CAPS Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent study course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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