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CAPS 1740 : Imperial China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1174, HIST 1740, MEDVL 1740 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course explores the history of imperial China between the 3rd century b.c.e. and the 16th century c.e. with a focus on the following questions:  How did imperial Chinese states go about politically unifying diverse peoples over vast spaces?  How did imperial Chinese approaches to governance and to relations with the outer world compare with strategies employed by other historical empires?  How did those approaches change over time?  How did major socio-cultural formations — including literary canons; religious and familial lineages; marketing networks; and popular book and theatrical cultures — grow and take root, and what were the broader ramifications of those developments?  How did such basic configurations of human difference as Chinese (civilized)-barbarian identity, high-low status, and male-female gender operate and change over time?
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CAPS 2209 : Daoist Traditions
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2289, HIST 2209, RELST 2209 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this course we will examine the modes of philosophical and spiritual inquiry, varieties of spiritual/bodily cultivation and practice, and religious organizations and movements in China that we know as Daoist (or "Taoist"). We will examine the ways in which Daoism was used variously to contest or legitimate imperial political power, and how the procedures and ideologies of the imperial state in turn informed Daoist theory and practice.  Throughout, we will examine the ways in which standard modern western dichotomies, such as sacred/secular, spiritual/physical, and mind/body, break down when we try to apply them to the study of Daoism.  Course will focus on the period from the fourth century B.C.E. to the thirteenth century C.E. 
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CAPS 2212 : Introduction to China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2212 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese culture especially designed for students not majoring in Asian Studies. Explores literature, history, religion, and art, and other aspects of China's rich and diverse heritage, from earliest times to the present.
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CAPS 2267 : Women and Society in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2267, FGSS 2267 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course offers a broad understanding of the active and dynamic cultural, economic, and social, and political roles played by Chinese women. By challenging the dominant stereotype of the passive and victimized Chinese woman, this course aims to examine women's struggles, negotiations, and challenges of the normative discourse of femininity and domesticity in terms of various disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, and literature. Through a combination of reading original texts with secondary scholarship, this course will discuss the issues of Confucianism and patriarchal family, the female body and sexuality, education and self-expression, women's work and religious activities, gender and the state, the modernization of women, etc.
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CAPS 2271 : China's Literary Heritage: An Introduction in Translation
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2271 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This is an introductory course designed for, though not limited to, non-majors with or without any knowledge of Chinese language, history, or culture. Its intent is to offer a "guided tour" through the development of some of the major themes and genres in classical Chinese poetry and narrative literature that have become the integral part of China's rich cultural heritage. All readings will be in English translation.
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CAPS 3403 : China Under Revolution and Reform
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3321, GOVT 3403 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course provides a broad overview of the evolution of Chinese politics from the early part of the 20th century to the present. It is roughly divided into two sections. The first traces the formation and the progression of modern state and party institutions following the collapse of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, through the communist rise to power and into the Mao era (1949-1976), culminating in the period of "opening up and reform" (1978-present). The second part of the course examines China's institutional apparatus, focusing on mapping out the government, Party, and military bureaucracies; examining relations between Beijing and the localities; and on the institutionalization of these structures and processes over time. No prior knowledge of China is required or expected.
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CAPS 3502 : Becoming a China Hand
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3503 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines the various issues that surround being a specialist of one of the world's most complex and exciting places. The course will first look at the various groups of people that have been China Hands, including missionaries, academics, businesspeople, journalists, and government officials. One central theme is the continual conflict between being a country specialist and gaining an understanding of the broader world. The second part of the class considers the strategies for going into the field and doing research on China, including finding a host and making connections, using written sources (electronic and printed), conducting interviews, and implementing formal surveys. The last segment of the class considers the charge that China Hands are prone to self-censorship because of ideological affinity.
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CAPS 4001 : China in Transition
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Using resources specifically available in China, this course combines lectures, guest lectures, field trips, and faculty-directed research projects to help students achieve an in-depth understanding of China's changing politics, economy, society, and culture.
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CAPS 4002 : Chinese Perspectives on International and Global Affairs
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course, offered by faculty members of Peking University's School of International Studies, provides Chinese perspectives on contemporary China's international relations.
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CAPS 4020 : Honors Thesis Tutorial II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
CAPS 4030 : Issues in China Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course serves as the wrap-up seminar for CAPS students.  It is designed for CAPS seniors to review the critical issues and topics in China and Asia-Pacific Studies from broader theoretical perspectives, to engage in academic discourse and policy debate about implications of China rising, to reflect on their four-year learning experience in Ithaca, Washington, D.C., and Beijing as students of contemporary China studies, and to enhance their abilities to pursue future studies and/or careers that are related to their CAPS experience after graduating from Cornell.  The seminar is organized around the central theme - China rising - and roughly divided into three sections:  (1) China's rise and the "paradigm change" in world politics; (2) China's quest for identity and order; and (3) implications of China rising for the U.S. and the world.  Under each of these sections, a few specific topics are identified for class discussion.
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CAPS 4071 : Law Culture and Society in China
Crosslisted as: LAW 4071 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What are the main obstacles on China's road towards the Rule of Law? What is the role of law in combatting corruption, protecting human rights and facilitating economic development in China? How are traditional views of Confucianism and Legalism influencing modern Chinese institutions and individuals? This course examines these and other complex issues by employing interdisciplinary and comparative approaches, focusing on the interaction between legal, cultural and social phenomena: how law shapes culture and society and how forms of culture and social relations influence the modernization of law.  The course is designed for undergraduate students who are interested in understanding contemporary China and Chinese law, especially the role of law in political, social and economic development.
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CAPS 4241 : Religion and the State in Chinese History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4422, HIST 4241, RELST 4241 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Religion and politics have had a complex relationship in Chinese history. While various systems of belief have been an integral part of state ideology or co-opted by the state to bolster its authority, they have also provided a potent basis for challenging the established order and fomenting rebellion. This course explores some of the major dimensions of this dynamic from ancient times up until the present day, with primary focus on the modern period. Considering such varied phenomena as imperial ritual sacrifice, the Taiping Rebellion, Tibetan Buddhism, and the current resurgence of religion under Communist rule, we will reflect on the dominant patterns and unique aspects of China's church-state model.
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CAPS 4242 : China's Encounter with Modernity
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4444, HIST 4242, HIST 6242 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course explores the processes and paradoxes of China's engagement with the modern world from the late Qing dynasty to the early years of Communist rule. This period witnessed epochal changes in Chinese society and culture, ranging from the adoption of republican government and expansion of print culture to the promotion of women's rights and explosion of nationalism. Taken together, these and other changes can be said to signify the emergence of Chinese modernity. Yet what exactly do we mean by the term "modernity"? And what makes modern China "modern"? This class will seek to answer these questions by examining in detail the concrete developments that were occurring in different spheres of Chinese society during the early twentieth century, while also considering the multiplicity of ways that scholars have utilized the concept of modernity to understand and analyze them.
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CAPS 4420 : Tang Poetry: Themes and Contexts
Crosslisted as: CHLIT 4420, CHLIT 6620, MEDVL 4420 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Through guided readings in Chinese of selected poems of the Tang dynasty (618-907) on various themes and in different styles, students develop the essential analytical skills for reading Tang poetry while gaining an understanding of its social, cultural, and historical contexts.
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CAPS 4827 : China, Tibet and Xinjiang
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4448, GOVT 4827, GOVT 6827 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Seminar intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system, with particular focus on the rise of Chinese nationalism and the extent to which those in Tibet, Xinjiang, and, to a lesser extent, Taiwan, are contesting such a trend. In so doing, the course emphasizes the interrelated, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy.
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CAPS 4999 : CAPS Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description